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Knife Attack Kills 19 at Japan Disability Center, Official Says

By Issei Kato SAGAMIHARA, Japan (Reuters) – Nineteen people were killed and 25 wounded after an attack by a knife-wielding man at a facility for the disabled in central Japan early on Tuesday, a government official said, in Japan's worst mass killing in decades. Police have arrested Satoshi Uematsu, a 26-year-old former employee at the facility in Sagamihara, Kanagawa Prefecture, about 25 miles (40 km) southwest of Tokyo, a Kanagawa prefecture official said. Uematsu had turned himself in, the official told a news conference carried on public broadcaster NHK.

Tips to Remove Dental Plaque

Failure to brush teeth properly destroys enamel, causing plaque to build. Failure to remove plaque creates bigger issues such as cavities, infections, …

Alaska Parental Notification Abortion Law Struck Down

JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — The Alaska Supreme Court on Friday struck down a state law requiring parental notification for girls under age 18 seeking abortions, agreeing with pro-abortion rights advocates that the mandate approved by voters in 2010 was unconstitutional.

Roche Beats Forecasts on New Drugs and One-Off Gain

By Ludwig Burger BASEL, Switzerland (Reuters) – Switzerland's Roche beat market expectations for adjusted net income in the first six months of the year, helped by cancer drug sales but also inflated by a one-off gain from its pensions scheme. Core earnings per share, adjusted for certain items, rose 7 percent to 7.74 Swiss francs ($7.86), where analysts had expected 7.52 francs on average. Deutsche Bank analyst Tim Race said that excluding that effect, results were broadly in line with expectations.

Florida Health Department Investigates Possible Local Zika Transmission

(Reuters) – Florida health officials said on Tuesday they are investigating a case of Zika virus infection that does not appear to have stemmed from travel to another region with an outbreak. The statement from the Florida Department of Health did not specify whether the Zika case was believed to have been transmitted via mosquito bite, sexual contact or other means. The department also reiterated guidance to Florida residents on protecting themselves from mosquitoes that may carry the virus.

China approves use of GSK vaccine Cervarix for cervical cancer

Drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline Plc said on Monday the China Food and Drug Administration (CFDA) has approved its human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, Cervarix, for use in the country to help women fight cervical cancer. GSK's China unit said in a statement Cervarix will be the first HPV vaccine licensed for use in the country and is expected to be launched there in early 2017. Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women aged between 15 to 44 years in China, with an estimated 130,000 new cases each year, it said.

Golf-Stenson wants to turn tables on Mickelson

By Larry King TROON, Scotland, July 16 (Reuters) – Henrik Stenson will start the final round of the British Open leading the championship, and trying not to think about how it’s going to end. “Thoughts of outcome are never really helping you,” he said at a news conference after his third round at Royal Troon, where he gained a one shot advantage over American Phil Mickelson. There’s no question about it.” Stenson’s one-shot lead puts the 40-year-old Swede as close as he’s ever been to winning his first major.

Cricket-Golf’s Rio exodus may hit sport’s Olympic prospects – ICC

High-profile withdrawals of male golfers from next month’s Rio Games might damage cricket’s chances of becoming an Olympic sport, fears the International Cricket Council (ICC). Golf’s return to Olympics for the first time since 1904 has been hit by big-name male withdrawals over health concerns triggered by the outbreak of the Zika virus in Brazil. The top four male golfers in the world — Jason Day, Dustin Johnson, Jordan Spieth and Rory McIlroy — have pulled out and ICC Chief Executive Dave Richardson fears a ripple effect.

Take precautions during laser hair removal, researchers advise

By Marilynn Larkin (Reuters Health) – The smelly “burning hair” smoke released during laser hair removal could be a health hazard, especially for people with heavy exposure to it, researchers report. The smoke contains chemicals that irritate the airways and are known to cause cancer, Dr. Gary Chuang told Reuters Health by email. Chuang, of the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, and colleagues also measured the concentrations of very fine particles in the plume that could be easily inhaled.